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FOUND 94 RESOURCES:

imageA Strange Fish Indeed: The "Discovery" of a Living Fossil
Through a series of fictionalized diary entries, this case recounts the 1939 discovery by Marjorie Courtenay-Latimer (and identification by J.L.B. Smith) of a living coelacanth, a fish believed to have been extinct for 70 million years.

Audience: 13-16

Source: Grant, Robert

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageA Survey About Science
Students conduct a survey about the nature of science, laws, theories, hypotheses, scientists, and evolution.

Audience: 13-16

Source: WGBH

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageAn antipodal mystery
The discovery of the platypus had the scientific world in an uproar with its mammal-like and bird-like features. How was one to classify the platypus? This case study uses this issue to model the scientific process, with scientists arguing, debating, collecting more evidence, and revising their opinions as new data become available.

Audience: 13-16

Source: Herreid, Clyde Freeman

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageArtificially Selecting Dogs
Students learn how artificial selection can be used to develop new dog breeds with characteristics that make the dogs capable of performing a desirable task.

Audience: 13-16

Source: Collins, Jennifer

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageBreeding Bunnies
Students simulate breeding bunnies to show the impact that genetics can have on the evolution of a population of organisms.

Audience: 13-16

Source: WGBH

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageCandy Dish Selection
Students find that selection occurs in a dish of mixed candies.

Audience: 13-16

Source: Tang, Carol

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageChimpanzee Droppings Lead Scientists to Evolutionary Discovery
Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) is thought to be a precursor to HIV. This multi-part case study explores changes in SIV in different chimpanzee populations and how researchers use this information to test hypotheses about the origins of HIV.

Audience: 13-16

Source: Kosal, Erica F.

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageEvolution and Antibiotic Resistance
Students learn why evolution is at the heart of a world health threat by investigating the increasing problem of antibiotic resistance in such menacing diseases as tuberculosis.

Audience: 13-16

Source: WGBH

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageEvolutionary processes and patterns inform medicine
In this activity, students use data and the principles of natural selection to explain the relatively high frequency of alpha-thalassemia in certain populations. They also learn how comparisons of genetic sequences help researchers studying cleft lip and palate, as well as how natural selection has conserved the genetic sequences responsible for these defects.

Audience: 13-16

Source: National Institutes of Health

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageGreat Fossil Find
Students are taken on an imaginary fossil hunt and hypothesize as to the identity of the creature they discover. Students revise their hypotheses as new evidence is "found."

Audience: 13-16

Source: ENSI

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageHominid Cranium Comparison (The "Skulls" Lab)
Students describe, measure and compare cranial casts from contemporary apes, modern humans, and fossil hominids to discover some of the similarities and differences between these forms and to see the pattern leading to modern humans.

Audience: 13-16

Source: ENSI

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageInvestigating Common Descent: Formulating Explanations and Models
Students formulate explanations and models that simulate structural and biochemical data as they investigate the misconception that humans evolved from apes.

Audience: 13-16

Source: National Academy of Sciences

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageInvestigating Natural Selection
Students experience one mechanism for evolution through a simulation that models the principles of natural selection and helps answer the question: How might biological change have occurred and been reinforced over time?

Audience: 13-16

Source: National Academy of Sciences

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageNot Just a Theory
Students engage in an activity that clarifies the scientific meaning of the term theory.

Audience: 13-16

Source: UC Museum of Paleontology

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageSelection and evolution with a deck of cards
This classroom exercise introduces the concept of evolution by natural selection in a hypothesis-driven, experimental fashion, using a deck of cards.

Audience: 13-16

Source: Evolution: Education and Outreach

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageStudying Living Organisms: Estimation of Population Growth by Counting Offspring: Seed Multiplication
This simple activity allows students to discover or reason through a portion of Darwin's theory of natural selection. Students use seeds from common fruits (e.g. apple seeds) to hypothesize/calculate the reproductive rate of a population, realize that such large populations do not exist, and conclude that organisms face a constant struggle to survive.

Audience: 13-16

Source: Access Excellence

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageThe Checks Lab
Students construct plausible scenarios using bank checks to learn how human values and biases influence observation and interpretation.

Audience: 13-16

Source: ENSI

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageThe Meaning of Genetic Variation
Students investigate variation in the beta globin gene by identifying base changes that do and do not alter function, and by using several internet-based resources to consider the significance in different environments of the base change associated with sickle cell disease.

Audience: 13-16

Source: National Institutes of Health

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageThe Missing Link
The setting for this case study is a paleontological dig in East Africa, where an undergraduate student has unearthed part of what appears to be an ancestral human skull. Students read the story and then examine a number of primate skulls. They are asked to build a phylogeny based on their observations.

Audience: 13-16

Source: Strasser, M. Elizabeth

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageThe Natural Selection Game
This is a board game that simulates natural selection. It is suitable for an introductory biology class and for more advanced classes where you could go into more detail on important principles such as the role of variation and mutation.

Audience: 13-16

Source: Gendron, Robert

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageUsing evolution to understand influenza
This lesson is driven by the question: Why is a new flu vaccine needed every few years? Students answer this question and gather other information about evolution and influenza as they create an outline of a brochure for a biotechnology company.

Audience: 13-16

Source: National Institutes of Health

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageUsing pipe cleaners to bring the Tree of Life to life
Students build a phylogenetic tree from pipe cleaners that allows them to rotate branches, compare topologies, map complete lineages, identify informative phylogenetic features, and examine the effects of superficial structural changes on the tree.

Audience: 13-16

Source: The American Biology Teacher

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageWhy Sex is Good
This case study is based on a 2005 journal article that deals with the issue of sexual vs. asexual reproduction and their relative merits—a question that has bedeviled biologists for more than a century. The article serves as the final stage of this case focusing on why sex is useful (at least in some circumstances).

Audience: 13-16

Source: Herreid, Clyde Freeman

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageA Strange Fish Indeed: The "Discovery" of a Living Fossil
Through a series of fictionalized diary entries, this case recounts the 1939 discovery by Marjorie Courtenay-Latimer (and identification by J.L.B. Smith) of a living coelacanth, a fish believed to have been extinct for 70 million years.

Audience: 9-12

Source: Grant, Robert

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageA Survey About Science
Students conduct a survey about the nature of science, laws, theories, hypotheses, scientists, and evolution.

Audience: 9-12

Source: WGBH

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageAlike but Not the Same
Students conduct a classwide inventory of human traits, construct histograms of the data they collect, and play a brief game that introduces students to major concepts related to human genetic variation and the notion of each individual's uniqueness.

Audience: 9-12

Source: National Institutes of Health

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageAn antipodal mystery
The discovery of the platypus had the scientific world in an uproar with its mammal-like and bird-like features. How was one to classify the platypus? This case study uses this issue to model the scientific process, with scientists arguing, debating, collecting more evidence, and revising their opinions as new data become available.

Audience: 9-12

Source: Herreid, Clyde Freeman

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageAncient Farmers of the Amazon
In this activity, students find out about research being conducted on Amazon leafcutter ants. They also watch video segments to make their own virtual field observations and write their own research proposals.

Audience: 9-12

Source: WGBH

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageArtificially Selecting Dogs
Students learn how artificial selection can be used to develop new dog breeds with characteristics that make the dogs capable of performing a desirable task.

Audience: 9-12

Source: Collins, Jennifer

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageBreeding Bunnies
Students simulate breeding bunnies to show the impact that genetics can have on the evolution of a population of organisms.

Audience: 9-12

Source: WGBH

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageCandy Dish Selection
Students find that selection occurs in a dish of mixed candies.

Audience: 9-12

Source: Tang, Carol

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageClipbirds
Students learn about variation, reproductive isolation, natural selection, and adaptation through this version of the bird beak activity.

Audience: 9-12

Source: UC Museum of Paleontology

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageEvolution and Antibiotic Resistance
Students learn why evolution is at the heart of a world health threat by investigating the increasing problem of antibiotic resistance in such menacing diseases as tuberculosis.

Audience: 9-12

Source: WGBH

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageExploring Variation and Heritability
Students explore the natural variations present in a variety of organisms by examining sunflower seeds and Wisconsin Fast Plants™ to consider the role of heredity in natural selection.

Audience: 9-12

Source: MUSE

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageGreat Fossil Find
Students are taken on an imaginary fossil hunt and hypothesize as to the identity of the creature they discover. Students revise their hypotheses as new evidence is "found."

Audience: 9-12

Source: ENSI

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageHardy-Weinberg Equilibrium According to Hoyle
Students achieve an understanding of the Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium by using decks of playing cards without recourse to algebra.

Audience: 9-12

Source: Cronkite, Donald

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageHominid Cranium Comparison (The "Skulls" Lab)
Students describe, measure and compare cranial casts from contemporary apes, modern humans, and fossil hominids to discover some of the similarities and differences between these forms and to see the pattern leading to modern humans.

Audience: 9-12

Source: ENSI

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageInvestigating Common Descent: Formulating Explanations and Models
Students formulate explanations and models that simulate structural and biochemical data as they investigate the misconception that humans evolved from apes.

Audience: 9-12

Source: National Academy of Sciences

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageInvestigating Natural Selection
Students experience one mechanism for evolution through a simulation that models the principles of natural selection and helps answer the question: How might biological change have occurred and been reinforced over time?

Audience: 9-12

Source: National Academy of Sciences

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageMaking 3D phylogenetic trees with mobiles
Students create three-dimensional trees in the form of mobiles so that the branching nodes pivot. Students can manipulate the mobile to see the relationships more clearly and combat common misconceptions about trees.

Audience: 9-12

Source: Carolina

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageMaking Cladograms
This lesson introduces students to the building of cladograms as evolutionary trees, showing how shared derived characters can be used to reveal degrees of relationship.

Audience: 9-12

Source: ENSI

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageModeling Modes of Evolution- PuncEq & Gradualism
Students learn the differences between "gradualism" and "punctuated equilibrium" by manipulating two sets of simulated fossils (Caminalcules).

Audience: 9-12

Source: McComas, William

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageMystery Meat
In this lesson students follow the steps of scientists Steve Palumbi (Stanford University) and Scott Baker (University of Oregon), who used DNA data (“Barcoding”) to reveal the species identifications of kujira (whale meat) from foreign markets. Their study used DNA data to identify unknown organisms in order to investigate whether whales are being illegally hunted and sold as meat. By going through the lesson, students practice various aspects of the process of science by asking scientific questions, collecting and analyzing data, comparing their results with those of the real researchers, and finally determining possible next steps.

Audience: 9-12

Source: Collins, Jennifer

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageNot Just a Theory
Students engage in an activity that clarifies the scientific meaning of the term theory.

Audience: 9-12

Source: UC Museum of Paleontology

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageOrigami Birds
Students build and evolve and modify paper-and-straw "birds" to simulate natural selection acting on random mutations.

Audience: 9-12

Source: ENSI

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageSelection and evolution with a deck of cards
This classroom exercise introduces the concept of evolution by natural selection in a hypothesis-driven, experimental fashion, using a deck of cards.

Audience: 9-12

Source: Evolution: Education and Outreach

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageThe Checks Lab
Students construct plausible scenarios using bank checks to learn how human values and biases influence observation and interpretation.

Audience: 9-12

Source: ENSI

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageThe Meaning of Genetic Variation
Students investigate variation in the beta globin gene by identifying base changes that do and do not alter function, and by using several internet-based resources to consider the significance in different environments of the base change associated with sickle cell disease.

Audience: 9-12

Source: National Institutes of Health

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageThe Natural Selection Game
This is a board game that simulates natural selection. It is suitable for an introductory biology class and for more advanced classes where you could go into more detail on important principles such as the role of variation and mutation.

Audience: 9-12

Source: Gendron, Robert

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageViruses and Host Evolution
Students learn about natural selection in rabbits by observing the effects of a virus on the Australian rabbit population.

Audience: 9-12

Source: Chamberlain, Don

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageXenosmilus
Students play the roles of paleontologists on a dig. They "unearth" a few fossils at a time and attempt to reconstruct the animal the fossils represent.

Audience: 9-12

Source: UC Museum of Paleontology

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageArtificially Selecting Dogs
Students learn how artificial selection can be used to develop new dog breeds with characteristics that make the dogs capable of performing a desirable task.

Audience: 6-8

Source: Collins, Jennifer

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageBattle of the Beaks
Students learn about adaptive advantage, based on beak function, by simulating birds competing for various foods.

Audience: 6-8

Source: UC Museum of Paleontology

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageBig Beans, Little Beans
Students measure and note the variation in the lengths of lima beans. Students then compare the growth rate of different sized beans.

Audience: 6-8

Source: UC Museum of Paleontology

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageBorn to Run: Artificial Selection Lab
Students are introduced to the field of experimental evolution by evaluating skeletal changes in mice that have been artificially selected over many generations for the behavioral trait of voluntary exercise wheel running

Audience: 6-8

Source: Garland, Theodore

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageClimate Analysis Using Planktonic Foraminifera
Students manipulate, plot, and interpret data on the occurence of a particular species of foraminifera in the fossil record in order to infer changes in climate during the last 160,000 years.

Audience: 6-8

Source: Olson, Hilary

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageClipbirds
Students learn about variation, reproductive isolation, natural selection, and adaptation through this version of the bird beak activity.

Audience: 6-8

Source: UC Museum of Paleontology

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageDino-Data
Students are presented with a set of data about dinosaurs and are asked to make hypotheses about what the data can tell us.

Audience: 6-8

Source: UC Museum of Paleontology

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageDogs and Turnips
In this lesson students attempt to assemble a meaningful sentence by successively turning over cards with words on them. The point is made that we change our ideas of what a story may be as we gather more information.

Audience: 6-8

Source: UC Museum of Paleontology

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageGreat Fossil Find
Students are taken on an imaginary fossil hunt and hypothesize as to the identity of the creature they discover. Students revise their hypotheses as new evidence is "found."

Audience: 6-8

Source: ENSI

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageHow Much is a Billion
In this activity, students get a sense of how big a billion really is, which is necessary in order to understand deep time.

Audience: 6-8

Source: Monk, Anne

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageInferring Ancient Environments from Fossil Foraminifera
Students analyze actual data from samples of microfossils collected from a particular locality. They use this data to infer water depths in the Miocene in order to locate potential petroleum reserves.

Audience: 6-8

Source: Olson, Hilary

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageInterpreting the Tracks
Students discover the relationships among foot length, leg length, stride length and speed in bipedal animals that provide clues about dinosaur speed.

Audience: 6-8

Source: UC Museum of Paleontology

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageSequencing Time
Students assign relative and numerical times to events in their lives to understand how scientists developed the Geologic Time Scale.

Audience: 6-8

Source: UC Museum of Paleontology

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageWhat Came First?
Students sequence actual events in the history of life on Earth and place them on a large timeline.

Audience: 6-8

Source: UC Museum of Paleontology

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageWho's on First? Relative Dating
Students sequence familiar items and then do a similar sequencing activity using fossil pictures to learn how paleontologists use fossils to give relative dates to rock strata.

Audience: 6-8

Source: Barber, Marsha and Bartos, Diane

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageXenosmilus
Students play the roles of paleontologists on a dig. They "unearth" a few fossils at a time and attempt to reconstruct the animal the fossils represent.

Audience: 6-8

Source: UC Museum of Paleontology

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageCoping with Environmental Differences
Students will observe and conduct an experiment to see whether differences in salinity (the environment) have an affect on the hatching rate and survival of brine shrimp.

Audience: 3-5

Source: UC Museum of Paleontology

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageDiversity Walk
In this lesson, students take a walk around the school grounds to discover the diversity of life that exists there.

Audience: 3-5

Source: UC Museum of Paleontology

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageHow Much is a Billion
In this activity, students get a sense of how big a billion really is, which is necessary in order to understand deep time.

Audience: 3-5

Source: Monk, Anne

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageIt's All Relative
In this lesson, students find pictures of living things and arrange them in collages, categorizing them according to which they think are more closely related to which.

Audience: 3-5

Source: UC Museum of Paleontology

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageMealworm Metamorphosis
Students will observe offspring (mealworms) that do not initially resemble their parent organism (darkling beetles) throughout complete metamorphosis. Students will also create and maintain an appropriate habitat for the mealworms.

Audience: 3-5

Source: UC Museum of Paleontology

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageObserving Brine Shrimp
Students observe brine shrimp eggs, create an appropriate environment for their survival, and observe their growth.

Audience: 3-5

Source: UC Museum of Paleontology

Resource type: Classroom activity

imagePreying on Beans
Students act as predators searching for prey (beans) in two different settings to demonstrate the processes of adaptation and selection.

Audience: 3-5

Source: UC Museum of Paleontology

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageReconstruction
Students reconstruct sentences by reassembling the words that have been cut apart.

Audience: 3-5

Source: UC Museum of Paleontology

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageTennis Shoe Detectives
Students make observations, examine data, and form hypotheses about a set of footprints and what they can tell us.

Audience: 3-5

Source: Heindel, Sharon

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageXenosmilus
Students play the roles of paleontologists on a dig. They "unearth" a few fossils at a time and attempt to reconstruct the animal the fossils represent.

Audience: 3-5

Source: UC Museum of Paleontology

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageA Long Time
The teacher puts up a timeline that shows students' age relative to geologic time.

Audience: K-2

Source: Janulaw, Sharon

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageBecoming a fossil
Students make imprints in clay using leaves or shells.

Audience: K-2

Source: Janulaw, Sharon

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageCan You Match Them?
Students find matching sounds by shaking containers and listening to sounds generated.

Audience: K-2

Source: Janulaw, Sharon

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageCan You Tell by Touch?
Students feel inside a bag and use only their sense of touch to describe and identify one of the objects inside the bag.

Audience: K-2

Source: Janulaw, Sharon

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageDifferences
Students observe and compare a variety of living things and pictures of living things to observe their similarities and differences.

Audience: K-2

Source: Janulaw, Sharon

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageDiversity
Students learn that there are many forms of living things by going for a walk and by observing living things in the classroom.

Audience: K-2

Source: Janulaw, Sharon

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageExtinction
Students are shown illustrations of living things and extinct life forms, which they compare and categorize as living or extinct.

Audience: K-2

Source: Janulaw, Sharon

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageForm and Function
Students select a part of a plant or animal and indicate how the part supports the needs of the living thing.

Audience: K-2

Source: Janulaw, Sharon

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageIn the Dark
Students, in pairs, go on a trust walk to use senses other than vision.

Audience: K-2

Source: Janulaw, Sharon

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageOh Say, What Can You See?
Students walk outdoors to use their sense of sight and record and compare their observations.

Audience: K-2

Source: Janulaw, Sharon

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageSniff and Guess
Students use their sense of smell to identify the contents of Mystery Odor Cans.

Audience: K-2

Source: Janulaw, Sharon

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageSounds Around
Students use their sense of hearing outdoors to discover things in their world.

Audience: K-2

Source: Janulaw, Sharon

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageTaster's Choice
Students taste foods and graph their likes and dislikes.

Audience: K-2

Source: Janulaw, Sharon

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageTextures Are Everywhere
Students use their sense of touch outdoors and record and compare their observations.

Audience: K-2

Source: Janulaw, Sharon

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageVariation
Students look at populations of living things and identify variations in physical features.

Audience: K-2

Source: Janulaw, Sharon

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageWhat Food Is It?
Students close their eyes and taste foods without using their sense of sight.

Audience: K-2

Source: Janulaw, Sharon

Resource type: Classroom activity

imageWhat in the World Do You Smell?
Students walk outside to use their sense of smell to discover odors in their world.

Audience: K-2

Source: Janulaw, Sharon

Resource type: Classroom activity


 

Teachers' lounges 9-12 Undergrad 6-8 3-5 K-2

All-level resources
Guide to Evo 101

Conceptual framework

Teaching resource database

Image library

Dealing with objections to evolution

Correcting misconceptions

Alignment with science standards

Suggest a lesson or resource for Understanding Evolution