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Evolution 101 Teaching materials Resource library

Evolution 101Our in-depth course on the science of evolution.
Teaching materialsThe ultimate resource for teachers.
Resource libraryA browsable archive of articles, tutorials, interactive investigations and more.

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Evo in the news

Evolution explains mosquitoes' taste for human blood - September, 2020
This summer the coronavirus pandemic forced many residents of the northern hemisphere out of air-conditioned spaces and into the great outdoors for socially distanced get-togethers, barbecues, playdates, drive-in movies, and dining. There, we became the de facto buffet for biting insects.  While we balanced our drinks, mosquitoes also had a sip … of human blood.  New research published this summer explains why some mosquitoes just can’t leave humans alone, while others prefer a nice, juicy guinea pig. The answer, of course, comes down to evolution.

Read the rest of the story here | See the Evo in the News archive

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Highlights

Beetle walking on branchThe Beetle Project: Investigating insects in a warming world
Teach high school and college students about connections between evolution and climate change with this new set of lab activities using live lady beetles!
Hubble Telescope The ChronoZoom Time Atlas of Earth History and Big History
Explore the insights into evolution provided by Big History. These graphic panels help explain deep time and life's place in this vast timeline.

Pleistocene puzzle cover page A Pleistocene Puzzle: Extinction in South America
In this comic, you'll follow the investigation of scientists Maria and Miguel as they solve a paleontological mystery. About 11,000 years ago, more than 80% of the large animal species in South America went extinct. Why did it happen? Maria and Miguel study an area in Chile called Ultima Esperanza. They discover many different lines of evidence that point to a warming climate and the arrival of humans as key causes of the extinctions.

Evo Connection Evo Connection slide sets
This series of short slide sets explain several basic biology topics in evolutionary terms. Each set includes notes to help you present every slide.
Jackson Njau CSI: Olduvai Gorge. The work of Jackson Njau
Follow paleoanthropologist Jackson Njau as he examines fossil evidence for clues of crocodile predation on early hominids.
Kim Bostwick How boogieing birds evolved: The work of Kim Bostwick
When ornithologist Kim Bostwick goes hunting with her binoculars, she's not just looking for birds; she's looking for untold evolutionary stories.

This site was created by the University of California Museum of Paleontology with support provided by the National Science Foundation (grant no. 0096613) and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (grant no. 51003439).